Tag Archives: children’s literature

Elisabetta Dami

Elisabetta Dami is an Italian children’s fiction writer and author of books for children.

Elisabetta Dami was born in 1958 in Milan, Italy. The daughter of publisher Piero Dami (founder of Dami Editore in 1972), she began working as a proofreader at the family publishing house and began to write her first stories at the age of 26.

Her experience gained from assisting sick children as a volunteer led to the idea of writing adventure stories featuring a mouse, Geronimo Stilton, as protagonist.

Her most famous work is the Geronimo Stilton series. Her other books have Thea Stilton and the Thea Sisters as the main characters. The Thea Sisters include Colette, Nicky, Pamela, Paulina, and Violet.

In 1999 Dami began to collaborate with the Piemme publishing house, which, decided to produce a collection of books for children. Since 2000, when the first story came out, 100 million copies have been sold in 150 countries and in 40 different languages. Intended for all children, she has written more than 100 books.

Source: Goodreads

Book review: Charlotte’s web

Author: E.B. White

Summary: Charlotte’s Web opens the door to a magical world, which a young girl named Fern finds herself a part of. Fern spends her free time with Wilbur the pig whom she loves and the other barn animals who play a large part in the life of Wilbur. Charlotte A. Cavatica, the large grey spider, befriends Wilbur and helps him deal with the shocking news that his life will end as bacon on someone’s plate. Charlotte goes as far as coming up with an interesting plan that only this spider could carry out with the help of Templeton the rat (who never does anything unless there is something in it for himself) to help Wilbur escape death.

This book is especially good for first time readers who have taken the big jump from short stories to a real novel. It is easy reading and the talking animals captivate the young children.

[ From http://www.edocere.org ]

Why kids like horror stories

Whether it’s shuddering through the latest horror film or delighting in the gory side of Halloween, many children seem to love being scared. What is it about being scared that lights up so many kids, tweens and teens?

Being Scared is an Easy Way to Take Risks
Children, particularly those in the late tween and teen years, tend to want to take risks. This occurs due to their cognitive development, which makes them feel invulnerable. They have few opportunities to take actual risks, however, like jumping from high places or traveling at high speeds. In other words, adult supervision, days filled by structured activities and their own self-control thwart their developmental desires. Therefore, it’s easiest to “take risks” by braving a haunted hayride, watching a scary Halloween movie, or going on a mind-bending roller coaster. They get the same sense of living on the edge, but in a forum that’s accessible and acceptable.

Being Scared Creates a Sense of Adventure
Tweens and teens also crave some unpredictability and adventure in their lives. A good portion of their days center around routines, including school, homework, mealtime and bedtime. While routines are important for healthy functioning, too much of the same thing can lead to boredom and even mood issues. Developmentally, tweens and teens are peaking in terms of physical abilities, energy and need for novelty. It makes sense, then, that they love being scared, because it “shakes things up” in their lives.

Being Scared Provides a Feeling of Success
Young tweens are developing a crucial part of their personality called industry. This means they want to feel like they can take on tasks and be successful at them. By putting themselves in scary situations, they get to actively test themselves. When they’ve made it through a whole horror flick, for example, their sense of industry is bolstered, as is their sense of self-esteem.

Being Scared Helps Children Understand Death
Children do not have an adult understanding of death until about thirteen years of age. As they struggle to understand the abstract concept of death, children often become fascinated by the topic. Since death is rather removed from everyday American lives, however, it is a difficult topic to explore. In addition, children find that if they discuss death or draw pictures involving death, teachers and parents tend to respond negatively. Therefore, a safe and culturally-acceptable way of exploring death is through horror movies and Halloween activities.

All in all, although being scared may overwhelm them at times, children find the feeling irresistible because it serves their ever-changing developmental needs.

[From http://tweenparenting.about.com%5D

Book review: Well done, Secret Seven

Author: Enid Blyton

This book is about a robbery. The Secret Seven have a new meeting place, that is on the top of a tree. Colin spots a man on the wall of the garden. Soon the Seven have a new friend, Jeff. He gives them some clues regarding the robbery. Will the Seven be able to find the thief? Read this engrossing book to find out.

Book review by: Karthik Murali, 6-B