Tag Archives: library

Use instead of ‘said’

If you are a writer and you want to show two or more people conversing, ‘said’ is the word you would use to
mark what is spoken. But it would tire your readers if you used ‘said’ too many times. So instead of ‘said’ you
could use a lot of other words that are given below, which could also make your writing more interesting and
expressive.

Here are dialogue words you can use instead of ‘said’, categorised by the kind of emotion or scenario they convey:

Anger: shouted, bellowed, yelled, snapped, cautioned, rebuked, demanded, growled, raged, miffed, seethed, fumed, retorted, thundered, blurted.

Affection: consoled, comforted, reassured, admired, soothed, agreed, approved.

Excitement: shouted, yelled, babbled, gushed, exclaimed, repeated.

Fear: whispered, stuttered, stammered, gasped, urged, hissed, babbled, blurted, begged, quacked, stammered, shuddered, quivered, trembled.

Determination: declared, insisted, maintained, commanded.

Authority: insisted, bossed, demanded, professed, preached, dictated.

Happiness: sighed, murmured, gushed, laughed, giggled, lilted, joked, rejoiced, sang out.

Sadness: cried, mumbled, sobbed, sighed, lamented, whined, bawled, blubbered, groaned, sniveled, wept, mourned.

Tired: mumbled, struggled, emitted, wearied.

Pain: barked, cried out, cried, screamed, jabbered, bellowed, groaned, howled, shrieked, roared, grieved, wailed, yelped.

Understanding: empathized, accepted, consoled, crooned, comforted, sympathized, agreed.

Conflict: jabbed, sneered, rebuked, hissed, scolded, demanded, threatened, insinuated, spat, glowered, complained.

Making up: apologised, relented, agreed, reassured, placated, assented, assured.

Request/Ask: beseeched, begged, implored, pleaded, entreated, appealed to, enjoined, urged, goaded, induced, persuaded, encouraged, petitioned, prayed.

Amusement: teased, joked, laughed, chuckled, chortled, sniggered, tittered, guffawed, giggled, roared.

Storytelling: related, recounted, continued, emphasized, remembered, recalled, resumed, concluded.

Answer: responded, retorted, replied, rejoined, answered, acknowledged.

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Paper sizes

We usually take prints in an A4 size paper. The size of this paper is 210 x 297mm or 8.3 x 11.7 in. There are other paper sizes also. The A paper size system was formally adopted in Europe in the 19th century and has since spread around the world. It is now used in nearly every country apart from the USA and Canada. A4 is the most common standard business letter size used in English speaking countries. This is the ISO 216 paper size system. This system is an international standard that is used in many places in the world in copy and print devices that defines paper sizes. Based on the metric system, the ISO paper size system uses a height-to-width ratio with an aspect ratio of 1 to 1.414 (The square root of 2). If a sheet is cut into two, the resulting halves are the same proportions as the original. The United States and Canada do not widely use the ISO standard paper sizes. Instead, the United States uses the Letter, Legal and Executive system.

Given below is a list of various paper sizes used in India.

A0 = 841 x 1189 mm 33.1 x 46.8 in
A1 = 594 x 841 mm 23.4 x 33.1 in
A2 = 420 x 594 mm 16.5 x 23.4 in
A3 = 297 x 420 mm 11.7 x 16.5 in
A4 = 210 x 297 mm 8.3 x 11.7 in
A5 = 148 x 210 mm 5.8 x 8.3 in
A6 = 105 x 148 mm 4.1 x 5.8 in
A7 = 74 x 105 mm 2.9 x 4.1 in
A8 = 52 x 74 mm 2.0 x 2.9 in
A9 = 37 x 52 mm 1.5 x 2.0 in
A10 = 26 x 37 mm 1.0 x 1.5 in

To obtain paper sizes in centimetres, convert mm values to cm by dividing by 10 and in feet by dividing inch values by 12.

For more information on paper sizes visit here.

Book Week competitions results (Shift I)

Here are the winners of the Book Week competitions (Shift I).

ONLINE QUIZ
1. Anjali AR (XI-A)
2. Sivani R (XII-B)
3. Anagha Anil (IX-C)

STORY WRITING COMPETITION
Primary Section
1. Meenakshy S Nair (IV-B)
2. Keerthana S (V-B)
3. Sara Biju (V-B)

Secondary Section
1. Gowri Haby (IX-C)
2. Anagha Anil (IX-C)
3. Neha Nasim (VII-B)

BOOKMARK DESIGNING COMPETITION
1. Nandana M (VIII-B)
2. Jennifer M Jiji (VIII-B)
3. Jawad S (VIII-B)

SLOGAN WRITING COMPETITION
1. Gopika B Kurup (IX-A)
2. Fathima Zahra (VIII-A)
3. Devi Ardra (IX-A) and Sandra Prasanth (IX-C)

Kendriya Vidyalayas in Ernakulam Region

The Kendriya Vidyalayas are a system of central government schools in India that have been instituted under the aegis of the Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD). It comprises over a thousand schools in India and three abroad.

The system came into being in 1963 under the name ‘Central Schools’. Later, the name was changed to Kendriya Vidyalaya. All the schools are affiliated to the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE). Its objective is to educate children of the Indian Defence Services personnel who are often posted to remote locations. With the army starting its own Army Public Schools, the service was extended (but not restricted) to all central government employees.

A uniform curriculum is followed by these schools all over India. By providing a common syllabus and system of education, the Kendriya Vidyalayas are intended to ensure that the children of government employees do not face education disadvantages while their parents are transferred from one location to another. The schools have been operational for over fifty years.

The Kendriya Vidyalaya Sangathan, which literally translates to ‘Central School Organisation’, oversees the functioning of these schools and has its headquarters in New Delhi. The administration of this body is based on levels; the chairman of Kendriya Vidyalaya Sangathan is always the Minister of Human Resource Development of the Government of India, and the deputy chairman is Minister of State of MHRD. The real working power lies with the Commissioner of KVS; there are additional commissioners to accompany Commissioner in the administration of KVS in different fields. The head of a KVS region is Deputy Commissioner accompanied by an Assistant Commissioner. There are individual principals of every KV administering the school.

As of March 2016, there were 1128 schools named Kendriya Vidyalayas. Kendriya Vidyalaya is one of the longest chain of school in world with 1125 schools in india and 3 operated in foreign.[2] A total of 1,209,138 students (as of 30 September 2015) and 56,445 employees were on the rolls (as of 1 September 2013). These were divided among 25 regions, each headed by a deputy commissioner.
(from Wikipedia)

The Ernakulam Region started functioning in April 2012. There are 37 Kendriya Vidyalyas in this region.

How to shelve books in a library

If you are thinking of volunteering at your library, here are some tips you can use for shelving the library books.

In every library, books are arranged in a pre-determined order so as to enable everyone to find the book they are looking for. Most school libraries use Dewey Decimal System for this purpose.

How does the Dewey Decimal System work? Learning the system is not difficult because it is logically organized and built on a decimal base. Essentially, every class of book is assigned a category number (a whole number, such as 800) and a cutter number or numbers (numbers to the right of the decimal point). These are the numbers you see on the spine of a library book, and they are referred to as the call number. The system is comprised of ten classes, which are further divided into 10 more subcategories, and each of those subcategories contains 10 subdivisions. The 10 main classes of the Dewey Decimal System are:

  • 000—Computer science, information and general works
  • 100—Philosophy and psychology
  • 200—Religion
  • 300—Social Sciences
  • 400—Language
  • 500—Science
  • 600—Technology and applied science
  • 700—Arts and recreation
  • 800—Literature
  • 900—History and geography

The books are arranged according to the above main classes and thier sub-divisions. Here is a short example of how you would find or shelve a book on biographies. A book on biography of Mahatma Gandhi will have the class number 920.054. The first digit “9” will tell you that the book belongs to “History and geography” section. The “20” tells you that the class is further sub-divided to indicate “biography”. “.054” will mean that it is a biography of someone from India. Obviously, the more numbers, the more specific the subject. The call number will usually have a “GAN” suffix (first three letters of “Gandhi”), so that when books are arranged all biographies of Mahatma Gandhi will come together.